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Thread: AO Almirante Montt

  1. #17
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    Montt en el 2010:

    Video:





    D....

  2. #18
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    Default El Montt en Canadá

    Se mueven rápidamente los acontecimientos!!!

    Hace poco Canadá estudiaba pedir apoyo a Chile o a España para provisión de petróleo en el mar en empleos conjuntos, mientras espera por su nuevo petrolero...

    Quote Originally Posted by 24 de junio de 2015, Jane´s
    To fill the gap, the government has been considering a number of options, including leasing ships and working with an international partner (such as Chile or Spain) to provide an offshore supply ship capability. "What we really need is something independent so we're not dependent on other countries," Kenney told reporters during a briefing in Ottawa."
    http://www.janes.com/article/52540/c..._source=eloqua

    y en menos de 9 días... ya el Montt está en Canadá!

    Hoy:

    Chilean Navy supply ship arrives to provide support to Royal Canadian Navy Published on: July 3, 2015 | Last Updated: July 3, 2015 2:20 PM EDT
    [IMG]

    A Chilean Navy supply ship arrived in Esquimalt, British Columbia today as part of an agreement which will enhance interoperability with the Royal Canadian Navy as well as provide RCN sailors the opportunity to continue replenishment-at-sea training pending the arrival of Canada’s new Queenston-class supply ships, the RCN noted in a news release.

    More details provided by the RCN:



    Through a Mutual Logistic Support Arrangement (MLSA), the Armada de Chile (Chilean Navy) will operate its replenishment ship AO-52 Almirante Montt for 40 sea days in the Canadian Pacific region in support to RCN training requirements.

    The training that will be conducted using the Chilean replenishment vessel, Almirante Montt, is vital to maintaining the individual skills and core seamanship abilities within the Canadian Fleet that are essential to deployed operations, as well as to retain the expertise necessary to operate the Queenston Class once they are delivered.

    This is an initial, short-term initiative to address the RCN’s at-sea support services capability gap. In order to assist the RCN to complete their missions over the next several years, the Government of Canada has decided to enter into preliminary discussions with Chantier Davie Canada Inc. about pursuing an interim capability for a commercial ship to be refitted for military use. Photo above: A Chilean Navy supply ship sails past Duntze Head when arriving at Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Esquimalt on July 3, 2015.

    Image by MCpl Chris Ward, MARPAC Imaging Services
    http://ottawacitizen.com/news/nation...-canadian-navy

    Es de esperarse que esto colabore con financiar el costo operativo del Montt... se mantiene entrenada y fogueada a la tripulación y se comparten los gastos de su despliegue con Canadá.

    Muy buena noticia! (Por Golf y Lagow en ZM)

    Esperemos que esta colaboración se sostenga en el tiempo y genere ahorros en el presupuesto operativo como para hacer espacio a otros requerimientos.

    Saludos

  3. #19
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    Muy interesante la noticia. Es una buena oportunidad que ha sido bien aprovechada por la marina chilena y que dice bastante de su nivel de preparación para que haya sido solicitado su apoyo por parte de la marina canadiense.

    El intercambio de experiencias y la interacción que desarrollarán entre ambas marinas es un bonus extra a lo dicho por HernanSCL.

    Saludos,

    Templario

  4. #20
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    Tiene sus Pro y sus Contras....



    D...





















  5. #21
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    Default Ya parte de vuelta el Montt, llega el 17 de Septiembre

    El Montt en su periplo de asistencia/arriendo a la Royal Canadian Navy

    The Almirante Montt – Chile’s supply ship supporting the Royal Canadian Navy




    David Pugliese, Ottawa Citizen

    Published on: August 24, 2015 | Last Updated: August 24, 2015 9:45 AM EDT


    I was able to tour the Chilean Navy supply ship the Almirante Montt, which is filling the role of helping train Royal Canadian Navy sailors and resupplying RCN ships during exercises on the west coast. As Defence Watch readers know the RCN is without its supply ships; one is decommissioned, the other will be soon.


    Here are some photos I took. The main photo shows the Almirante Montt coming into CFB Esquimalt, the other is of Chilean Navy Cap. (N) Andrés Rodrigo, who commands the Almirante Montt.


    The third photo below was provided by the ship and it shows some of the crew in front of the BC legislature in Victoria.

    My article on the Almirante Montt can be found here: http://ottawacitizen.com/news/politi...y-supply-ships
    http://ottawacitizen.com/news/nation...-canadian-navy

    Siguiendo el segundo link:

    How a Chilean vessel fills in for Canadian Navy supply ships
    David Pugliese, Ottawa Citizen
    Published on: August 23, 2015 | Last Updated: August 23, 2015 7:40 PM EDT


    Royal Canadian Navy sailors assist in the docking of the Chilean Navy supply ship Almirante Montt at Canadian Forces Base Esquimalt. Photo by David Pugliese

    VICTORIA, B.C. – The Chilean Navy supply ship, the Almirante Montt, appears on the horizon looking like a grey speck. But as it moves toward a jetty at Canadian Forces Base Esquimalt, the immense size of the vessel soon becomes apparent.

    It takes almost 20 minutes for Chilean Navy Capt. Andrés Rodrigo to gingerly manoeuvre the ship, which is the length of more than two football fields, to the concrete structure jutting out from the shore.

    Canadian sailors on the jetty grab the lines thrown from the Almirante Montt, securing the vessel.

    The ship is the newest recruit, albeit a temporary one, for Canada’s navy. Since early July, it has been going out to sea on refuelling and resupply missions for Canadian warships. “We’re here to help provide training and support,” says Rodrigo, who has 25 Canadian sailors on board.

    Just 50 metres from the jetty is the reason Canada is relying on Chile to now resupply its ships and train its sailors.

    HMCS Protecteur, severely damaged by an engine room fire in 2014, sits idle at a dock. Protecteur was decommissioned earlier this year. Canada’s other resupply ship, the aging HMCS Preserver, is expected to be decommissioned later, leaving the navy without the capability to refuel and support its ships at sea or train its sailors in the required skills for those operations.

    Such supply vessels are critical to a navy since they provide fuel, ammunition and food for warships taking part in exercises or operations.

    But the Canadian navy estimates it will be another six years before its planned Joint Support Ships — already beset by various delays — are ready to do that job.

    In June, the Conservative government announced it was negotiating with Chantier Davie Shipyard of Lévis, Que., to lease a commercial refuelling tanker that could be used as a stop-gap until the Joint Support Ships are operating. Industry officials say a deal is close to being finalized but it could take another 15 months before the commercial ship is ready.

    In the meantime, Canada has made a deal with Chile to provide the Almirante Montt for naval operations on the west coast. Canada spent $6 million for access to the supply ship for 40 sea days this summer. The vessel arrived at CFB Esquimalt July 3 and has been at sea on a regular basis, refuelling warships such as HMCS Vancouver and HMCS Calgary.

    A similar arrangement is expected to be reached with Spain’s navy later this year for a supply ship to support Canadian vessels on the east coast.

    Rodrigo said his crew find it easy working with the Canadians. “Our procedures are very similar,” he explained.

    Rodrigo said this is the first time the Almirante Montt has supported such foreign training. But he noted that Chile and Canada have had a long-established military exchange program, with officers from both navies either studying at each other’s training facilities or serving on board ships.

    “Twenty years ago, I served on HMCS Calgary,” said Rodrigo.

    The Canadians training on Almirante Montt are almost evenly made up of veteran sailors and relatively new members of the navy. Canadian navy officers say it’s important to keep current on the specialized skills needed when transferring supplies between two moving ships at sea.

    Such an undertaking involves bringing the Almirante Montt within 50 metres of a Canadian ship and linking the two by steel cables so supplies can be offloaded.

    Chilean Navy First-Lt. Branko Ljubetic, who provided the Citizen with a tour of the Almirante Montt, pointed out the massive hose systems positioned on the side of the vessel, which are used to pump fuel to a waiting warship. The Almirante Montt can carry up to 20 million litres of fuel.

    “It’s quite a process and it takes special training,” he explained.

    The sprawling ship has seemingly endless corridors and large cabins. The vessel has 12 decks, and a large area on the top deck for sea containers of equipment and a helicopter.

    Six years ago, Chile faced its own decision on how to replace its aging supply ship. Instead of building a new vessel, it purchased a U.S. Navy ship that had been constructed in 1987 and mothballed nine years later.

    Chile spent $30 million to purchase the ship and refurbish it. During that process, the engine systems were modernized and new communications equipment installed, said Rodrigo.

    In 2010, the vessel, renamed the Almirante Montt, went into service as the largest ship in Chile’s fleet. Chile’s navy also purchased a commercial tanker and that vessel is back home providing support to the fleet, Rodrigo said.

    He said the Almirante Montt will leave Canada on Aug. 25, arriving in Chile on Sept. 17. “These days have been a remarkable period of operations at sea, with a strong and professional navy,” he noted. “We have built a remarkable relationship between both navies and unfortunately we are leaving good friends who made the port of Esquimalt as our home.”

    But Rodrigo also said the Chilean ship will be back. The vessel is expected to provide support to Canada’s navy until 2017, he said.

    dpugliese@ottawacitizen.com

    Twitter.com/davidpugliese


    Almirante Montt

    The Almirante Montt is the former U.S. Navy supply ship Andrew J. Higgins. The vessel was built in 1987 and mothballed by the U.S. in 1996. It was purchased by Chile in 2009.

    Length: 206 metres

    Displacement: 42,000 tons

    Speed: a maximum of 20 knots

    Capacity: 20 million litres of fuel

    Crew: 150



    Canada’s quest for a supply ship

    The Royal Canadian Navy has been trying to get new supply ships since the 1990s. In 2004, the Liberal government announced it would finally proceed with the purchase of those vessels.

    In 2006, the Conservative government re-announced the project, saying that the first of what was being called the Joint Support Ships would be delivered by 2012.

    But in 2008, the project was derailed when it was determined that shipyards couldn’t provide the capabilities needed by the navy on the budget that had been set.

    The $2.9-billion plan to acquire the two support ships was restarted but there have been further delays. The navy now estimates the first ship will arrive in 2021.
    http://ottawacitizen.com/news/politi...y-supply-ships

    De los USD 30 millones metidos invertidos en el Montt, ya se han recuperado 4 con el deal canadiense. Fuera de bromas es buena forma de rentabilizarlo.

    Bien por la tripulación que aumenta su experiencia en operaciones fuera del país con una marina OTAN.

    Y bien por los del Araucano, (de doble casco) que opera y entrena aquí cubriendo las necesidades inmediatas. Tener dos tanqueros tiene sus ventajas, lo mismo debiese aplicar para otros ámbitos de la defensa (LSDH, AEW&C) como forma de respaldar la disponibilidad cuando una plataforma no pueda operar por diversas razones.

    Saludos
    Last edited by HernanSCL; 26-08-2015 at 12:31 AM.

  6. #22
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    Aca otra imagen del Montt En Canada:


  7. #23
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    Para amenizar, un video reciente del MINDEF del blanco naval mas grande de los filibusteros. El único detalle en su oportunidad, es que hay que ir buscarlo y, encontrarlo......el mar es alguito vasto.


    Gentileza Strike Nahuel


    Saludos.

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